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Teen Birth Control Birth Control

Religious communities in schools encourage various programs with the intention of having teenagers ready to go through diverse social difficulties. However, they constantly tend to go over the topic of contraception, as religion does not support it.

Even after seeing the effect that unwanted births have on teenagers, religious communities are not supportive towards birth control. Irresponsible adults condemn birth control, claiming that the government should finance proper education, instead of investing into something that they believe is not a true necessity.

Even with the fact that religious communities do not support birth control programs, Americans generally appear to be encouraging teenagers to use contraception. A large percentage from the general public believes that birth control should be covered by health insurances. Also, they believe that sex education should involve issues concerning contraception through abstinence. There are a number of educational institutions supporting the concept of teaching teenagers that they have to be abstinent. However, these respective institutions fail from addressing matters such as birth control. Cheryl Wetzstein claims that birth rates among adolescents are not influenced by the fact that they are being taught that they should be abstinent.

Having teenagers learn a great deal about sexual abstinence and nothing about birth control means that the state is willing to invest into programs that actually have little to no effect on adolescents.

The best method for governments to prevent high birth rates among teenagers would be for them to teach adolescents how to have sex, instead of teaching them that sex is bad and that they should avoid performing the act.

The fact that a teenage mother is not physically prepared to support child birth in good conditions can have a bad effect on the childs birth. In addition, there is a large probability for the child to be affected by his or her mothers inadequate abilities to raise them. Studies show that mothers that give birth during adolescence are likely to become inseminated again shortly after giving birth to their first child.

With the countless measures of contraception existing in the present, it is very easy for teenagers to prevent unwanted pregnancies. There are a number of adolescents complaining that they cannot use contraception because of the costs that such methods involve. However, government-supported programs are known to give away condoms and birth control pills to teenagers, for free. Taking this into account, it is virtually impossible for unwanted pregnancies to appear, with the only thing that teens have to do in order to avoid child birth being to consult their sexual education teachers.

All in all, birth control is a matter that needs more attention, both from teenagers and from adults. It is vital that adolescents receive proper instruction relating to how they should have sex.

Works cited:

1. Barth Richard P., Painter John S., Sangalang Bernadette B. “First-Birth Outcomes and Timing of Second Births: A Statewide Case Management Program for Adolescent Mothers.” Health and Social Work, Vol. 31, 2006.

2. Sawhill, Isabel V. “What Can Be Done to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Out-of-Wedlock Births?.” Retrieved November 28, 2009, from the Brookings Web site: http://www.brookings.edu/papers/2001/10childrenfamilies_sawhill.aspx

3. Schwartz, Michael. “Sex as Apple Pie.” National Review, Vol. 40, June 10, 1988.

4. Wetzstein, Cheryl. “Poll Finds Majority Back Birth Control; Access Sought without Delay.” The Washington Times, June 8, 2007.

5. Young, Eric. “Study: Religious Beliefs Strongly Predict Teen Birth Rates.” Retrieved November 28, 2009, from the Christian Post Web site: http://www.christianpost.com/article/20090917/study-religious-beliefs-strongly-predict-teen-birth-rates/index.html

Sawhill, Isabel V. “What Can Be Done to Reduce Teen Pregnancy and Out-of-Wedlock Births?.” Retrieved November 28, 2009, from the Brookings Web site: http://www.brookings.edu/papers/2001/10childrenfamilies_sawhill.aspx

Schwartz, Michael. “Sex as Apple Pie.” National Review, Vol. 40, June 10, 1988.

Wetzstein, Cheryl. “Poll Finds Majority Back Birth Control; Access Sought without Delay.” The Washington Times, June 8, 2007.

Barth Richard P., Painter John S., Sangalang Bernadette B. “First-Birth Outcomes and Timing of Second Births: A Statewide Case Management Program for Adolescent Mothers.” Health.

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